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Nevada Adult Education & Family Literacy Act Handbook

Updated September 2019

Bristlecone from cheshire

About the Bristlecone Pine

The State Tree of Nevada is the Bristlecone Pine, one of the oldest living things on earth. It is hardy, drought resistant, and determined to grow where other things cannot. It is used as a symbol for Adult Education in Nevada because it reflects tenacity, durability, and dedication to purpose.

Nevada Department of Education – Adult Education staff:

Nancy Olsen Adult Education Programs Supervisor/WIOA Title II State Director
Arianna Florence – Business Process Analyst I
Kendra Wastun – Administrative Assistant III

The Nevada Department of Education is an equal opportunity employer and does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, sex, age, religion or religious creed, national origin, sexual orientation, ancestry, or disability.

Introduction

On July 22, 2014, President Obama signed into law the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA). WIOA is designed to help job seekers access employment, education, training, and support services to succeed in the labor market and to match employers with the skilled workers they need to compete in the global economy. WIOA establishes ambitious goals for the integration of workforce service programs. These goals are intended to maximize the value and benefits of services under federally funded workforce development programs.

As a core partner under WIOA, Adult Education - Title II has certain responsibilities above and beyond what was previously required under the Workforce Investment Act of 1998 (WIA). WIOA places a heavy emphasis on transition from adult basic education to postsecondary education, training, or employment. While WIOA continues to emphasize high school completion for youth and adults, WIOA recognizes that completion of high school is not an end in itself but a means to further opportunities and greater economic self-sufficiency. Through the implementation of career pathways, integrated education and training, and workforce preparation activities, WIOA sets the stage for Adult Education’s important role in workforce development.

The Nevada Unified State Plan (July 1, 2016 through June 30, 2020) implements the Adult Education and Family Literacy Act (AEFLA), Title II of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act of 2014. The Plan provides the framework for the State to make funding decisions for programs, activities and services that include adult education literacy, workplace adult education and literacy activities, family literacy activities, English language acquisition activities, integrated English literacy and civics education, workforce preparation activities, and integrated education and training.

This handbook provides a guide for Adult Education administrators in Nevada. Detailed policies and procedures can be found in all sections of the Nevada Adult Education Administrator’s Handbook. Any program deviations from policies outlined in this handbook must be authorized, per occurrence, in writing by the Nevada Department of Education (NDE) and documentation of the exception approval must be retained by the local provider.

Vision

Nevada Adult Education will be the catalyst to empower and prepare Nevadans to achieve their life goals and aspirations.

Mission

Nevada Adult Education creates innovative and responsive educational opportunities for diverse adult students.

Purpose of Adult Education in Nevada

The purpose of Adult Education in Nevada is to increase the reading, writing, speaking, comprehension, mathematics, and problem-solving skills of adult students so they can achieve their life, work, and educational goals.

Instructional Program Goals

  1. To ensure that adult students meet their learning goals and achieve core measures through adult education programs that are effective and of high quality.
  2. To encourage providers to integrate technology into instruction and to use technology effectively in reporting program outcomes.
  3. To ensure cooperative/collaborative efforts between providers and community resource agencies.
  4. To promote workforce preparation and workplace literacy.
  5. To promote family literacy.

Section 1:  Program Administration

1.1 Eligible Provider

The term eligible provider means an organization that has demonstrated effectiveness in providing adult education and literacy activities. Organizations may include:

  • a local educational agency
  • a community-based organization or faith-based organization
  • a volunteer literacy organization
  • an institution of higher education
  • a public or private nonprofit agency
  • a library
  • a public housing authority
  • a nonprofit institution
  • a consortium or coalition of the agencies, organizations, institutions, libraries, or authorities listed in the previous bullets
  • a partnership between an employer and any entity listed in the previous bullets

1.2 Eligible Student

A student who is eligible to receive Title II services is one:

  1. Who has attained 16 years of age;
  2. Who is not enrolled or required to be enrolled in secondary school under State law
  3. Who—
    1. Is basic skills deficient;
    2. Does not have a secondary school diploma or its recognized equivalent, and has not achieved an equivalent level of education; or
    3. Is an English language student (section 203(4) of WIOA).

To be served through AEFLA funds students must be at least 16 years of age and not enrolled or required to be enrolled in a secondary school.  All persons under the age of 18 must provide documentation showing they have been excused from compulsory school attendance before they can be enrolled. (Nevada Revised Statutes, Chapter 392, Pupils) Programs must retain copies of documentation in the student’s files. Individuals with an F-1, B-1, or B-2 Visa (student visa) status are ineligible for services and shall “not be accorded a course of study in a publicly funded adult education program.” [Source: U.S. Immigration and Nationality Act (Sec. 1101a (15)(F)(1))]

1.3 Program Activities

  • Adult Basic Education (ABE): instruction designed for an adult whose Educational Functioning Level (EFL) is equivalent to, or below, an eighth grade literacy level as described in the National Reporting System EFL guidelines.
  • Adult Secondary Education (ASE): instruction designed for an adult whose EFL is equivalent to, or above a ninth grade literacy level as described in the NRS EFL Guidelines.
  • Career Pathways: According to WIOA, the term "career pathway" means a combination of rigorous and high-quality education, training, and other services that—
    1. aligns with the skill needs of industries in the economy of the State or regional economy involved;
    2. prepares an individual to be successful in any of a full range of secondary or postsecondary education options, including apprenticeships registered under the Act of August 16, 1937 (commonly known as the "National Apprenticeship Act"; 50 Stat. 664, chapter 663; 29 U.S.C. 50 et seq.) (referred to individually in this Act as an "apprenticeship", except in section 171);
    3. includes counseling to support an individual in achieving the individual’s education and career goals;
    4. includes, as appropriate, education offered concurrently with and in the same context as workforce preparation activities and training for a specific occupation or occupational cluster;
    5. organizes education, training, and other services to meet the particular needs of an individual in a manner that accelerates the educational and career advancement of the individual to the extent practicable;
    6. enables an individual to attain a secondary school diploma or its recognized equivalent, and at least one recognized postsecondary credential; and
    7. helps an individual enter or advance within a specific occupation or occupational cluster (WIOA section 3).
  • Career pathways have multiple entry and exit points that allow individuals to achieve education and employment goals over time. Career Pathways may include apprenticeships, on the job training; industry recognized credentials, non–credit training and certificates, credit certificates and degrees. Career pathways used in Integrated Education and Training must at least include the components listed in the WIOA definition.
  • Corrections Education: educational programs, such as ABE, ASE, ESL, and peer tutoring, for criminal offenders in correctional institutions and other institutionalized individuals.
  • Corrections programs must use Title II funds in accordance with section 225 of WIOA for educational programs for criminal offenders in correctional institutions and other institutionalized individuals, including academic programs for ABE and ASE, ESL, Peer Tutoring, IET, and/or Career Pathways. Corrections programs must give priority to individuals who are likely to leave a correctional institution within five years of participation in the program.
  • English as a Second Language (ESL): instruction designed for individuals for whom English is not their first language and who are unable to speak, read, or write the English language.
  • Family Literacy: activities that are of sufficient intensity and quality to make sustainable improvements in the economic prospects for a family, that better enable parents or family members to support their children’s learning needs, and that integrate all of the following activities—
    1. Parent or family adult education and literacy activities that lead to readiness for postsecondary education or training, career advancement, and economic self-sufficiency;
    2. Interactive literacy activities between parents or family members and their children;
    3. Training for parents or family members regarding how to be the primary teacher for their children and full partners in the education of their children; and
    4. An age-appropriate education to prepare children for success in school and life experiences (section 231(d) of WIOA; 34 CFR 463.30).
  • Family Literacy is an optional activity. Programs must not use funds for the purpose of supporting or providing programs, services, or activities for individuals who are not eligible individuals as defined in the Act, except that such agency may use such funds for such purpose if such programs, services, or activities are related to family literacy activities. Prior to providing family literacy activities for individuals who are not eligible individuals, an eligible provider must attempt to coordinate with programs and services that do not receive funding under this title. (34 CFR 463.20 (c))
  • Integrated Education and Training (IET): must include three components—
    1. Adult literacy activities as described in 34 CFR 463.30.
    2. Workforce preparation activities as described in 34 CFR 463.34.
    3. Workforce training for a specific occupation or occupational cluster which can be any one of the training services defined in section 134(c)(3)(D) of the Act.
  • In order to meet the requirements that the adult literacy activities, workforce preparation activities, and workforce training be integrated, services must be provided concurrently and contextually such that—
    1. Within the overall scope of a particular integrated education and training program, the adult literacy
    2. activities, workforce preparation activities, and workforce training:
      1. Are each of sufficient intensity and quality, and based on the most rigorous research available, particularly with respect to improving reading, writing, mathematics, and English proficiency of eligible individuals;
      2. Occur simultaneously; and
      3. Use occupationally relevant instructional materials.
    3. The integrated education and training program has a single set of learning objectives that identifies specific adult literacy content, workforce preparation activities, and workforce training competencies, and the program activities are organized to function cooperatively. (34 CFR 463.37)
  • Programs meet the requirement that the integrated education and training program is for the purpose of educational and career advancement if the adult literacy component of the program is aligned with the state’s content standards and the integrated education and training program is part of a career pathway. (34 CFR 463.38)
  • Integrated English Literacy and Civics Education (IELCE): services provided to English language students who are adults, including professionals with degrees and credentials in their native countries that enable such adults to achieve competency in the English language and acquire the basic and more advanced skills needed to function effectively as parents, workers, and citizens in the United States. Such services must include instruction in literacy and English language acquisition and instruction on the rights and responsibilities of citizenship and civic participation, in combination with integrated education and training activities (see section 243(a) of WIOA).
  • Programs that receive funding under section 243 must be designed to prepare adults who are ELLs for, and place them in, unsubsidized employment in in-demand industries and occupations that lead to economic self-sufficiency, and integrate with the local workforce development system and its functions to carry out the activities of the program.
  • IELCE programs must include: 
    1. Instruction in literacy and English language acquisition and instruction on the rights and responsibilities of citizenship and civic participation; and
    2. IET activities must include ABE/ASE and/or ESL, Workforce Preparation, and Workforce training for a specific occupation or occupational cluster (34 CFR 463.73).
  • Workforce Preparation: include activities, programs, or services designed to help an individual acquire a combination of basic academic skills, critical thinking skills, digital literacy skills, and self-management skills, including competencies in—
    1. Utilizing resources;
    2. Using information;
    3. Working with others;
    4. Understanding systems;
    5. Skills necessary for successful transition into and completion of postsecondary education or training, or employment; and
    6. Other employability skills that increase an individual’s preparation for the workforce.
  • Programs must offer Workforce Preparation concurrently with another activity such as ABE, ASE, ESL, IET, or IELCE and be consistent with the organizational requirements for those activities.
  • Workplace Adult Education: activities include ABE, ASE, or ESL content which addresses the improvement of the productivity of the workforce. Workplace Adult Education activities are offered by programs in collaboration with an employer or employee organization at a workplace or an offsite location.

Section 2: Funding and Fiscal Management

Title II programs are authorized by the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (Public Law 113-128 (29 U.S.C. Sec. 3101, et. seq.)) (WIOA) of 2014, Adult Education and Family Literacy Act (Title II). Regulations and guidelines governing programs are codified in the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Title 34 CFR Parts 461, 462, 463 et al. and Title 2 CFR 200—Uniform Administrative Requirements, Cost Principles, and Audit Requirements for Federal Awards (Uniform Guidance).The purpose of this section is to facilitate the state, regional and local coordination and fiscal management of federal grants administered under the authority of the AEFLA. This section is designed to consolidate federal and state procedures required for budget management.

2.1 Federal Funding

NDE distributes federal funds provided by the Adult Education and Family Literacy Act (AEFLA) in accordance with the provisions set forth in the Act. The Basic State Grant is distributed to individual programs as subgrants; funds are allocated as follows:

  • State Administration of the Program (not more than 5.0%)
  • State Leadership Projects (not more than 12.5%)
  • Programs of Instruction (remaining funds, at least 82.5%)

Local Providers

Local providers are awarded AEFLA federal and state funds through a competitive grant process with the State using the following required considerations (WIOA Title II Section 231 (e)) as a part of the review of applications:

  1. the degree to which the eligible provider would be responsive to— (A) regional needs as identified in the local plan under section 108; and (B) serving individuals in the community who were identified in such plan as most in need of adult education and literacy activities, including individuals— (i) who have low levels of literacy skills; or (ii) who are English language students;
  2. the ability of the eligible provider to serve eligible individuals with disabilities, including eligible individuals with learning disabilities;
  3. past effectiveness of the eligible provider in improving the literacy of eligible individuals, to meet State-adjusted levels of performance for the primary indicators of performance described in section 116, especially with respect to eligible individuals who have low levels of literacy;
  4. the extent to which the eligible provider demonstrates alignment between proposed activities and services and the strategy and goals of the local plan under section 108, as well as the activities and services of the one-stop partners;
  5. whether the eligible provider’s program— (A) is of sufficient intensity and quality, and based on the most rigorous research available so that participants achieve substantial learning gains; and (B) uses instructional practices that include the essential components of reading instruction;
  6. whether the eligible provider’s activities, including whether reading, writing, speaking, mathematics, and English language acquisition instruction delivered by the eligible provider, are based on the best practices derived from the most rigorous research available and appropriate, including scientifically valid research and effective educational practice;
  7. whether the eligible provider’s activities effectively use technology, services, and delivery systems, including distance education in a manner sufficient to increase the amount and quality of learning and how such technology, services, and systems lead to improved performance;
  8. whether the eligible provider’s activities provide learning in context, including through integrated education and training, so that an individual acquires the skills needed to transition to and complete postsecondary education and training programs, obtain and advance in employment leading to economic self-sufficiency, and to exercise the rights and responsibilities of citizenship;
  9. whether the eligible provider’s activities are delivered by well-trained instructors, counselors, and  administrators who meet any minimum qualifications established by the State, where applicable, and who have access to high quality professional development, including through electronic means;
  10. whether the eligible provider’s activities coordinate with other available education, training, and social service resources in the community, such as by establishing strong links with elementary schools and secondary schools, postsecondary educational institutions, institutions of higher education, local workforce investment boards, one-stop centers, job training programs, and social service agencies, business, industry, labor organizations, community- based organizations, nonprofit organizations, and intermediaries, for the development of career pathways;
  11. whether the eligible provider’s activities offer flexible schedules and coordination with Federal, State, and local support services (such as childcare, transportation, mental health services, and career planning) that are necessary to enable individuals, including individuals with disabilities or other special needs, to attend and complete programs;
  12. whether the eligible provider maintains a high-quality information management system that has the capacity to report measurable participant outcomes (consistent with section 116) and to monitor program performance; and
  13. whether the local areas in which the eligible provider is located have a demonstrated need for additional English language acquisition programs and civics education programs.

Programs are required to align services with Local Workforce Development Board local plans and proactively collaborate with WIOA mandatory core partners. These include Title I Adult, Youth, and Dislocated Workers, Wagner-Peyser, and Vocational Rehabilitation, and required one-stop partners.

2.2 Funds by Type

AEFLA Federal Funds – Basic Instruction

At least 82.5% of federal funds are awarded for basic instruction. All expenditures of federal funds, which may include up to 20% of federal funds for corrections education, must be allowable, reasonable and allocable in compliance with applicable federal and state law and regulations. AEFLA funds made available for adult education and literacy activities must supplement and not supplant state or local funds expended for adult education and literacy activities.

AEFLA Federal Funds- IELCE Funds

IELCE funds must be used for IELCE activities only. Expenditures of IELCE funds must be allowable, reasonable and allocable in compliance with applicable federal and state law and regulations. When necessary the costs may be determined by a reasonable method to determine the portion of costs going to IELCE. For example; the proportion of students enrolled in IELCE classes versus regular ABE, ASE, or ELL classes could be used to determine the portion of building costs charged against IELCE funds. The method used must be made clear within the budget.

State Funds

Approximately $402,000 in state funds are awarded each year and used for part of the state required match.  All expenditures of state funds must be allowable, reasonable and allocable in compliance with applicable federal and state law and regulations.

Match

Nevada must match at least twenty-five percent of the total amount of funds expended for adult education and literacy activities in the state with state and local contributions, which may be in cash or in-kind; the state must then maintain the level of effort.

Local providers are required to match federal funds awarded by 25%. Match may be in-kind or cash and all expenditures used for match must be allowable, reasonable and allocable in compliance with applicable federal and state law and regulations.

Program Income Policy

CFR 200.80 defines program income as gross income earned by the subgrantee that is directly generated by a federally funded project or activity or earned as a direct result of a federal sponsored project during the period of performance.

CFR 200.307 identifies the requirements related to program income. As summary:

  • Non-federal entities are encouraged to earn income to defray program costs where appropriate.
  • Costs related to the generation of program income may be deducted from gross income as long as the costs were not directly charged to the Federal award.
  • Sale of property, equipment, or supplies are not considered program income, but requirements of 200.311, 200.313 and 200.314 apply.
  • Addition: Program income is added to the Federal award. This will increase the amount of the Federal award.

Program Income Requirements

  • If grantees plan to collect student fees for any services provided with grant funds, the grantee must prove that the fees are necessary and reasonable.
  • Fees cannot impose a barrier for students and lack of ability to pay a fee must never prevent enrollment.
  • Any fee for service monies collected at the local level must be reported as “program income” and must be reinvested in the adult education program.
  • Program income expenditures must be in support of the adult education programs and be allowable, reasonable and allocable in compliance with applicable federal and state law and regulations.
  • Program income may not be reported as local match.
  • Program income must be accounted for in program records using a separate account and using approved methods of calculating, using, reporting, and applying program income as defined in 2 CFR 200.307.
  • The amount of program income earned and the amount expended must be reported on the annual Final Financial Report (FFR) report and the supplemental FFR developed by the Office of Adult Education. Any costs associated with the generation of the program income that are not charged to the grant should be deducted from the program income earned, and the net program income should be the amount reported.

2.3 Initial Budgets

Local providers must complete budgets for all federal funds through ePAGE. A separate budget document is required for State funds and must be uploaded into ePAGE as a part of a Continuation Funding Application or following an award notice through the competitive grant process.

When preparing the budgets the local provider should check for the following:

  1. Is the planned expenditure allowable and allocable?
  2. Is there sufficient detail to determine the allowability of planned expenditures?
  3. Is the budget item listed under the correct function code (i.e., administrative or instructional) and is there enough detail to verify which function code it should be under?
  4. What is the non-instructional cost percentage of federal funds?
  5. Does the federal budget include funds for activities that were previously paid with state or local funds, thereby supplanting?
  6. If you receive IELCE funds and use a proportion of the funds for expenditures, how did you determine the proportion? Did you document this in the budget detail?

Official budget forms are posted online in ePAGE. All budgets, budget revisions and requests for funds will be submitted and approved through ePAGE for federalfunds.

Instructional, Support Services, and Administrative Costs

Costs that fall under the “Instruction” category are those that directly impact students. Costs for “Administration” or Non-instructional services reflect expenditures which support the instructional program; they include administrative expenses and indirect costs.

Non-instructional costs may not exceed 5% of the federal grant funding without specific approval. If 5% is too restrictive to allow for adequate planning, administration, professional development, and interagency coordination a higher rate may be negotiated with the Office of Adult Education. A “WIOA Title II Non-instructional Costs Waiver” form must be completed and submitted in ePAGE to request greater than 5% non-instructional costs.

Non-instructional costs include those costs associated with administration of the program, including supervision of faculty and staff, reporting and data entry, fiscal management, and professional development. If the program is requesting Restricted Indirect Costs, the rate approved by the institutions cognizant federal agency, or 8% as allowed under 34 CFR 76.564 must be included in the request for a higher than 5% non-instructional cost.

Non-instructional

For administration of the program, including:

  • direct and indirect costs
  • supervision of faculty and staff
  • reporting and data entry
  • fiscal management
  • professional development

Salaries and fringe benefits of personnel engaged in executive activities, financial and management tasks, reporting of student data, legal or audit activities, local program monitoring, procurement, data processing, communications, and other similar functions.

Costs identifiable with program administrative positions such as the purchase of:

  • materials
  • supplies
  • equipment
  • space
  • travel

Activities associated with the development of a grant application.

Instructional

Instructional costs are those associated with carrying out adult education and literacy activities. All costs associated with providing instruction for adult education students. These costs include:

  • teachers’, aides’ or assistants’ salaries
  • equipment for the classroom
  • curriculum purchases and educational materials
  • rental of classroom space

All costs associated with the development and implementation of curriculum for classroom instruction. All costs associated with the student intake and enrollment process. Activities such as:

  • testing
  • counseling
  • student eligibility determination, including the collection of necessary information to determine eligibility
  • costs associated with the placement of students in the program

Activities that are carried out by a titled administrative staff person that include:

  • outreach to provide classroom space for students
  • application and intake activities
  • curriculum development
  • other direct activities that are considered instructional in nature

High School Equivalency testing functions are unallowable costs under AEFLA (HSE preparation, however, is allowable). AEFLA funds may not be used for paying for a test or for the salary, in part or whole, of HSE testing personnel or for funding professional development activities for HSE testing staff.

Allowable Costs

All expenditures submitted for reimbursement under this grant must be for proper and efficient administration of the program. An allowable cost must be reasonable (2 CFR 200.404) and allocable (2 CFR 200.405) to the Title II program and not shifted from another program or project. Allowable costs are determined by federal regulations.

Pursuant to Uniform Guidance, except where otherwise authorized by statute, costs must meet the following general criteria in order to be allowable under federal awards:

  1. Be necessary and reasonable for the performance of the federal award and be allocable thereto under these principles;
  2. Conform to any limitations or exclusions set forth in these principles or in the federal award as to types or amount of cost items;
  3. Be consistent with policies and procedures that apply uniformly to both federally-financed and other activities of the non-federal entity;
  4. Be accorded consistent treatment. A cost may not be assigned to a federal award as a direct cost if any other cost incurred for the same purpose in like circumstances has been allocated to the federal award as an indirect cost;
  5. Be determined in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP), except, for state and local governments and Indian tribes only, as otherwise provided for in this part;
  6. Not be included as a cost or used to meet cost sharing or matching requirements of any other federally-financed program in either the current or a prior period. See also 2 CFR 200.306 Cost sharing or matching paragraph (b); and
  7. Be adequately documented (2 CFR 200.403).

Unallowable Costs

Unallowable costs are prohibited under Title II. Payments made for costs determined to be unallowable by either the federal awarding agency, cognizant agency for indirect costs, or pass-through entity, either as direct or indirect costs, must be refunded (including interest) to the Federal Government in accordance with instructions from the federal agency that determined the costs are unallowable unless federal statute or regulation directs otherwise (2 CFR 200.410). Explicitly disallowed costs (2 CFR 420-475) include:

  1. Bad debt
  2. Cost of construction or purchase of facilities or buildings
  3. Lobbying
  4. Sectarian worship, instruction, or proselytization
  5. Light refreshments
  6. Promotional items and memorabilia
  7. Advertising costs that are not specifically related to the grant program
  8. Commencement and convocation costs
  9. Contributions and donations
  10. Student activity costs unless specifically provided for in the grant award

Recognition Ceremonies

Although NDE encourages the recognition of practitioners, administrative staff, and students for their accomplishments, no AEFLA funds, including federal, state, local match, or program income, may be used for these purposes due to federal regulations.

2.4 Reimbursement Request for Funds

The federal government restricts the amount of “cash on hand” that can be kept at the state and local level. Therefore, request for funds should be submitted on a monthly basis in an amount not to exceed expenses incurred during the period.

Federal Funds (Basic and IELCE)

Requests for reimbursement of federal funds must be submitted through ePAGE and all requests must include supporting general ledger documentation. Once the Office of Adult Education receives the request it is reviewed and either approved or rejected for necessary corrections. If it is rejected the subgrantee will be notified and will have to resubmit once corrections are made.

After the Office of Adult Education approves the reimbursement request it goes to the Grants Office for approval before payment is made. The Office of Adult Education will not approve reimbursement without adequate detail on, or attached to, the supporting general ledger documentation. Typically payment is made within two to four weeks after submission in ePAGE.

State Funds

Grant recipients should ensure that allowable state and local funds are spent prior to federal funds. Requests for reimbursement of state funds must be submitted on the approved form and sent to grantsinfo@doe.nv.gov . All requests must include supporting general ledger documentation. The Office of Adult Education will be notified of receipt of the request and once the request is approved it will be forwarded to the Grant Office for approval and payment. The Office of Adult Education will not approve reimbursement without adequate detail on, or attached to, the supporting general ledger documentation. Typically payment is made within two to four weeks after it is submitted.

2.5 Budget Revisions

The subgrantee may internally authorize transfers of funds between Object Codes if such changes are less than 5% or $2,000, whichever is less, or between Sub-Object Codes if such changes are less than 50% or $10,000, whichever is less.

No Cost Revision

Some, but not all, no-cost revisions require a budget amendment. An amendment is required:

  1. When the change would constitute a transfer of funds from one Object Code to another. The budget revision must be submitted and approved before the transfer can occur. It might be necessary to revise the written narrative to justify the transfer of funds.
  2. When a transfer of funds results in an increase or decrease in the amount budgeted in an Object Code that is in excess of 5% or $2,000, whichever is less.
  3. When there is a transfer of funds between Sub-Object Codes in excess of 50% or $10,000, whichever is less.
  4. When there movement between Instruction and Non-instructional costs.

Cost Revision

An increase or change to the total amount of the subgrant is a cost revision. Any decrease in the total amount of the original approved budget must also be submitted in the form of a cost revision.

2.6 Final Financial Reports

Upon completion of each fiscal year, those agencies that received funding through the Adult Education and Family Literacy Act are to submit final report of expenditures of federal funds through ePAGE. A supplemental fiscal report and the FFR for state funds must be completed separately.

These reports should accurately reflect the actual expenses of each project.  Because funds are reimbursed there should be no funds to return, however, if there are for any reason each grant recipient will be required to return any cash on hand.

Supplemental Final Financial Report

  • Program Income
    • Amount collected
    • Expenditures
    • Remaining amount  
  • Training Costs
    • Federal basic funds used for training
    • State funds used for training
    • Local funds used for training
    • Section 225 funds used for training
    • Section 243 funds used for training
  • Career Services Costs
    • Federal basic funds used for Career Services
    • State funds used for Career Services
    • Local funds used for Career Services
    • Section 225 funds used for Career Services
    • Section 243 funds used for Career Services
  • Section 243
    • Local funds used for IELCE services        
  • Section 225 Funds
    • Local funds used for Corrections Education
  • Infrastructure Costs
    • Federal funds used for infrastructure costs
    • State funds used for infrastructure costs
    • Local or in-kind funds used for infrastructure costs
  • Number of participants receiving:
    • Training services
    • Career services

Training costs are for all integrated education and training programs, including under IELCE funds.

Career Services include:

  • Outreach, intake, and orientation information
  • Initial assessment of skill levels including literacy, numeracy, and English language proficiency, as well as aptitudes, abilities, and supportive services needs
  • Referrals to and coordination of activities with other programs and services
  • Provision of performance information and program cost information on eligible providers of education, training, and workforce services by program and type of provider
  • Provision of information on availability of supportive services or assistance and appropriate referrals (including child care; child support; medical or child health assistance available through the State’s Medicaid program and CHIP; SNAP benefits; EITC; assistance under TANF, and other supportive services and transportation)

Annual Assets/Items of Value Reports

A capitalized asset purchased with state or federal funds is non-expendable property that costs more than $5,000 and has a useful life of more than one year. Items of value are those items that cost between $1,000 and $4,999.

Both capitalized assets and items of value must be reported at the end of the year on the appropriate forms. These reports should be cumulative—that is, they should reflect the program’s master inventory list of assets purchased with grant funds.

Section 3: Program Monitoring

Uniform Guidance (2 CFR 200.331) mandates that NDE conduct program monitoring of Title II programs. The purpose of monitoring is to ensure that programs use federal awards for authorized purposes in compliance with the laws, regulations, and provisions of the grant agreement and that performance goals are achieved. Programs are expected to be responsive to NDE’s, including the PD Contractor’s, technical assistance efforts, which may include meetings, workshops, and trainings. As recommendations arise from technical assistance, programs are expected to implement them in a timely manner.

Monitoring of subgrantees will include one or more of the following:

  • Onsite monitoring
  • Desk monitoring
  • Targeted monitoring

3.1 Risk Assessment

During the fall of each program year the NDE will conduct an annual assessment of each WIOA Title II subgrantee to determine risk associated with funding and delivery of services. Those determined to be at significant risk will have onsite monitoring. The risk assessment developed includes the following:

  1. Program did not receive AEFLA funding in the previous fiscal year.
  2. The AEFLA and/or IELCE grant awards total over $500,000.
  3. Addition of new services (example: ESL or IET) or expansion of services.
  4. Other entities (state/federal grant managers, partner agencies, auditors, staff employed by the program, etc.) have alerted our office of potential risks.      
    1. Example: Student with disabilities is told that they cannot provide accommodations because it’s too expensive. Student or other agency contacts us to let us know.
    2. Audit reports come back with findings.
    3. Fiscal office calls us with program concerns.
    4. Core partners contacts us with lack of cooperation from another title II program.
  5. Program is or has been under warning/probation status within the past two years.
  6. Program proposal or continuation application needed to be significantly altered due to required changes after the competition/Conditional Funding.
    1. Examples: Section of the RFP/CFA was not addressed.
    2. Conditional Funding example: past effectiveness is questionable – every month send additional report and participate in technical assistance.
  7. There was a 25% or more increase or decrease in AEFLA funding from the previous program year (Including IELCE).
  8. Grantee has missed the deadline for submission of more than three (3) AEFLA reports or grant requirements in the last fiscal year. Including:
    1. Continuation Funding Application
    2. Request for funds – quarterly (October 15th, January 15th, April 15th, Final day for RFF per fiscal office).
    3. Final Financial Report
    4. Final Narrative Report
    5. Data Quality Report – quarterly (October 15th, January 15th, April 15th, TBD).
  9. 30% or less of participants made a Measurable Skill Gain.
  10. The grantee did not meet at least 50% of negotiated targets. (2019-2020 will not include Table 5 targets)
    1. Targets will include all Educational Functioning Levels and employment 2nd quarter after exit, employment 4th quarter after exit, median earnings, and credentials obtained.
  11. The program collects fees from students.
  12. Program that was funded last year had turnover in the program director or key personnel within the last twelve (12) months.
    1. Key personnel would include fiscal staff, Accountability Lead, etc.
  13. Agency returned 10% or more of grant funding in previous year - including IELCE, or any portion of State funds.
  14. Documented concerns with the grantee’s last Final Financial Report filed.
    1. Inconsistency between Final Financial Report and final General Ledger.
    2. Inconsistency between Final Financial Report and last approved budget/revision.
  15. The grantee failed to follow through with technical assistance recommendations provided by the State office in the previous fiscal year.
  16. Cost per student is more than two times higher than other programs in a similar geographic area.

3.2 Onsite Monitoring

Those subgrantees determined to need onsite monitoring will be contacted within 30 days of completion of the risk assessment to schedule the monitoring visit. The following components will be included for the monitoring; state staff pre-visit documentation review, subgrantee pre-visit documentation to submit, onsite evidence collection, classroom observations, and interviews with subgrantee students, staff, and administration.

Within 45 days of the monitoring visit state staff will send a report to the subgrantee with commendations, recommendations, concerns, findings (if any) and next steps. If there are findings a corrective action plan will be required. Serious findings could place the subgrantee on a Warning, Probation, or in extreme situations, a Termination Status.

Warning, Probation, or Termination Status (WPTS) Process

Whether as a result of a monitoring visit, desk-monitoring, or other activity, programs are subject to the following process if NDE staff have observed failure to perform the activities described in the Request for Proposals or Continuation Funding Application, or outlined in the assurances, including, but not limited to:  failure to provide required reports, failure to be on track to meet the performance targets, or failure to meet the performance targets.

Any of the preceding could result in NDE placing the provider on: (1) warning status, (2) probation status, or (3) termination status. At any time, NDE may require a targeted improvement plan and/or corrective action plan. If a targeted improvement plan or corrective action plan is required NDE will work with the provider to develop the plan. Technical assistance will be provided or made available by the NDE Adult Education staff. In the event the program fails to meet the objectives of the targeted improvement plan and/or corrective action, NDE may move the provider to termination status. In the event of Probation or Termination, NDE will communicate the program status in writing to the immediate supervisor, and president, superintendent, or executive director of the sponsoring institution.

  1. Warning Status- A notification of Warning Status will entail a description of the issue in question, what action is needed or if a Corrective Action Plan is required, technical assistance available, what outcome is required, and/or, possible targets for removal from Warning Status. Periodic additional reports will be required. Some issues may be quickly addressed while others may take a year or more to meet requirements to be removed from Warning Status.
  2. Probation Status- Probation Status could be a result of a Warning Status which was not addressed, or the original discovery of a more serious issue. Notification of Probation Status will detail what outcome is required, and/or, possible targets for removal from Probation Status and require development of a Corrective Action Plan, participation in technical assistance, and submission of periodic reports. It could take multiple program years to address issues and be removed from Probation Status.
  3. Termination Status- Programs will be placed under Termination Status based on either the egregious misuse of funds or a failure to address an issue or issues for which the program has been placed on Probation Status. Termination could include temporarily withholding funds, cutting funds, or eliminating all grant funds depending on the severity of the matter. Termination Status may be appealed through the Director of the Office of Career Readiness, Adult Learning, and Education Options.

3.3 Targeted Monitoring

Targeted monitoring is onsite or desk monitoring that is used to focus on a particular area of concern. It may be initiated by state staff or requested by a local administrator.

Targeted monitoring may be focused on:

  • Compliance
    • fiscal areas;
    • ADA
    • assessment; or
    • accountability data
  • Performance

Within 45 days of targeted monitoring state staff will send a report to the subgrantee with commendations, recommendations, concerns, findings (if any) and next steps. If there are findings a corrective action plan will be required. Serious findings could place the subgrantee on a Warning, Probation, or in extreme situations, a Termination Status.

3.4 Desk Monitoring

All subgrantees will be subject to desk monitoring each program year, as well as quarterly for data validation and performance. The following types of reports are required:

Quarterly Program Report

Quarterly Program Report that checks for timely and accurate data entry, appropriate timeframes for assessments, performance data, and completeness of data collections.

Requests for Funds (RFF)

 RFF’s are required in a monthly or at least quarterly basis and are checked for accuracy, as well as, allowability, including whether the expenditures are reasonable and allocable to the particular project.

Final Financial Report and Supplemental Final Financial Report

A subgrantee FFR and Supplemental FFR is due within 60 days of the end of the fiscal year. These reports should accurately reflect the actual expenses of each project.  Each grant recipient will be instructed to return any cash on hand. State staff will review the reports for accuracy and to check for any anomalies between the report and previous budget information.

Capitalized Assets Report

A capitalized asset purchased with state or federal funds is non-expendable property that costs more than $5,000 and has a useful life of more than one year. Items of value are those items that cost between $1,000 and $4,999.

Both capitalized assets and items of value must be reported at the end of the year on the appropriate forms. These reports should be cumulative by reflecting the program’s master inventory list of assets purchased with grant funds.

Narrative Report

The narrative report describes program activities for the year.  It should include responses to the following questions:

  1. Analyze program’s statistical reports, especially with regard to student outcomes and discuss your observations. Looking at outcomes by level, in which levels did the program excel? To what would you attribute the success in those levels?
    1. Did the program’s current year performance meet the State-negotiated performance targets?
    2. Describe plans to improve performance in those levels below the state targets.
  2. Describe successful activities, programs, and/or projects that enabled your program to address the goals in the previous year’s RFA and/or the WIOA Unified State Plan.
  3. Describe involvement with the One-Stop system and any Title II funds used to support activities or services through the One-Stop delivery system. (Include integration of activities with other adult education, career development, and employment and training activities.)
  4. If not all allocated basic funds were expended please explain the reason.
  5. Describe successful activities and services supported with IELCE funds, including the number of adult students served.
    1. If not all allocated IELCE funds were expended please explain the reason.

Section 4: Instruction Standards and Student Support Services

4.1 Student Registration, Intake, and/or Orientation

Although not strictly required, the Office of Adult Education strongly encourages, and most programs utilize, a managed enrollment process, with scheduled beginning and ending dates for instruction. Sessions may be scheduled according to program needs (e.g., six to ten weeks, a college semester, etc.) and are usually established around specific curricula for ABE, ESL, or HSE preparation.  Programs offering managed enrollment classes with a strong emphasis on regular and consistent student attendance typically experience a higher student retention rate and greater learning gains. 

Each program must have in place an intake process that includes the following elements:

  • Registration: Collect demographic information for recording in the statewide student information system.
  • Orientation: Provide information about the program to the student and, if needed, refer the student to support services within the program or through other agencies in the community.
  • Assessment:  Determine student’s educational functioning level and appropriate class/delivery method following the Nevada Adult Education Assessment Policy.
  • Advising and Interview: Collect employment barriers and assist student with goal setting.
  • Class/instructional assignment.

4.2 Student Attendance

Programs should have an attendance policy which is made available to all students. An effective attendance policy should:

  • provide clear expectations for students
  • provide clear steps for teachers to report non-compliance
  • stipulate consequences and options for students when the policy is violated
  • detail actions to be taken by administration

4.3 Delivery of Instruction

  • Instruction is delivered through classes, small group instruction, and tutoring. In general:
  • Instruction is delivered at community colleges, schools, community-based organizations, businesses, community buildings, prisons, jails, faith-based organizations, or anywhere students can be accommodated.
  • Whenever possible instruction is year-round, from July 1 through June 30 (fiscal year).
  • Instruction takes place at convenient times to enable working adults to participate and utilize available resources.
  • Any cost to the student for instruction or materials must be fair, reasonable, equitable, and not present a barrier for those economically disadvantaged.

4.4 Distance Learning

Distance education is a formal learning activity where students and instructors are separated by geography, time, or both for the majority of the instructional period. Materials are delivered through a variety of media including, but not limited to, print, television broadcasts, computer software, web-based interaction, and other online technologies. Teachers support distance students through communication via mail, telephone, e-mail, or other web-based technologies or software.

Distance education activities have special requirements for enrollment, assessment, curriculum and accountability. Please see the Nevada Adult Education Distance Education Policy document in Appendix B, which describes the types of activities approved for distance education and outlines the requirements and procedures for reporting distance education contact hours.

4.5 Standards

OCTAE emphasized the importance of content standards by requiring that states describe how they align their content standards for adult education with the “State-adopted challenging academic content standards, as adopted under section 1111(b)(1) of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965, as amended (20 U.S.C. 6311(b)(1)).” Through alignment with the national College and Career Readiness Standards for Adult Education, the Nevada Adult Education Standards are aligned with the Nevada State Standards for K12.

4.6 Essential Components of Reading Instruction

WIOA (section 231 (e)) requires that states consider the extent to which an eligible provider uses instructional practices that include the essential components of reading instruction in awarding Title II grants. The Adult Education and Family Literacy Act (Title II) states that the term “essential components of reading instruction” has the meaning given the term in section 1208 of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 6368) which is explicit and systematic instruction in:

  • phonemic awareness;
  • phonics;
  • vocabulary development;
  • reading fluency, including oral reading skills; and
  • reading comprehension strategies.

4.7 Service to Students with Special Needs

AEFLA-funded programs will provide reasonable accommodations, as required by ADA and other federal and state laws, to those adults with disabilities. “Special needs” is a broad term that incorporates the need for some type of accommodation. For example, students with special needs may have a physical disability, a learning disability, or a developmental disability.

  1. Programs must provide fully accessible services and ensure that these services meet reasonable criteria according to federal and state law and the policies of their organization.
  2. Programs must require that adult students with disabilities are responsible for requesting accommodations and for submitting documentation of their disability.
  3. Programs must follow their organization’s policy regarding services to individuals with disabilities.
  4. Programs must provide accommodations at no cost to the student.
  5. Programs must provide students with the same disabilities services as other individuals receiving educational services in the organization, including assessment, counseling, advising, and provision of reasonable accommodations, assistive technology, and other accommodations available to other students.
  6. Programs must provide the same accommodations for testing as they do for instruction.

4.8 Reasonable Progress

A student with a documented disability must demonstrate progress toward an "appropriate" goal. If the student cannot or does not demonstrate progress, the program should have a record of the student’s identified goal(s), plan for achieving the goal(s), monitoring of progress, etc. It is not unreasonable for a program to emphasize that adult education is an education program and participation in the program requires measurable education or workforce readiness progress.

For students with a documented disability, to ensure programs are not being discriminatory, there must be reasonable accommodations regarding scheduling and assignment formats. However, if the student is still showing no learning gains, even on teacher-constructed tests, end-of-chapter tests, etc., then the student (and perhaps an advocate) needs to be informed that unless measurable progress toward a goal is made by a defined future date, then the student will no longer be a participant in the program because the program is not appropriate for this student.

When this process is followed, students have been given due process, programs have not been discriminatory, and the program has followed a consistent process that documents that concerted efforts were made to help the student meet education and workplace readiness goal(s). If a student is not making measurable progress and the elements listed above are in place, including reasonable accommodations, the adult education program may not be appropriate for the student. The program must have a very consistent process that is used with each and every student. When a consistent process is followed with every student, the program should have documentation that confirms that the program is, or is not, an appropriate placement for the student. For example, if a student is not making progress because of excessive absences, the program will have a record of the student’s attendance, a record of contact with the student explaining the necessity for consistent attendance and consistent effort for the student to achieve their goal(s). With this documentation, it is not unreasonable to remove a student when the student obviously does not (cannot or will not) meet the program's reasonable expectations leading to goal attainment.

Student handbooks and other orientation materials should state very clearly the expectations of the program; that all students will identify and work toward an appropriate education or workforce readiness goal and those students will demonstrate ongoing measurable progress.

Section 5:  Staffing and Professional Development

5.1 Staffing

Although there are no statewide requirements for hiring or evaluating instructors and tutors, as part of ongoing statewide program improvement efforts, program directors are encouraged to follow several effective practices:

  • Programs are strongly encouraged to develop clear position descriptions for instructional and administrative staff.
  • Programs should require all practitioners who are new to adult education in Nevada to complete the state’s online pre-service training and turn in the coursework to the program administrator prior to beginning instruction.
  • Programs should encourage all practitioners and staff to participate in quality staff development opportunities, be they local, regional, or national.
  • Programs are strongly encouraged to provide stipends for staff development.
  • Programs are strongly encouraged to implement a process for regular evaluation.

5.2 State Leadership Funded Professional Development

Using not more than 12.5 percent of the grant funds to carry out State Leadership activities, NDE allocates funds for the following required adult education and literacy activities:

  1. The alignment of adult education and literacy activities with other core programs and one-stop partners, including eligible providers, to implement the strategy identified in the Nevada WIOA Unified State plan, including the development of career pathways to provide access to employment and training services for individuals in adult education and literacy activities.
  2. The establishment or operation of high quality professional development programs to improve the instruction provided pursuant to local activities required under WIOA section 231(b), including instruction incorporating the essential components of reading instruction as such components relate to adults, instruction related to the specific needs of adult students, instruction provided by volunteers or by personnel of a State or outlying area, and dissemination of information about models and promising practices related to such programs.
  3. The provision of technical assistance to eligible providers of adult education and literacy activities receiving funds under this title, including— (i) the development and dissemination of instructional and programmatic practices based on the most rigorous or scientifically valid research available and appropriate, in reading, writing, speaking, mathematics, English language acquisition programs, distance education, and staff training; (ii) the role of eligible providers as a one-stop partner to provide access to employment, education, and training services; and (iii) assistance in the use of technology, including for staff training, to eligible providers, especially the use of technology to improve system efficiencies.
  4. The monitoring and evaluation of the quality of, and the improvement in, adult education and literacy activities and the dissemination of information about models and proven or promising practices within the State.

State Leadership funds may also be used for the following permissible activities:

  1. The support of State or regional networks of literacy resource centers.
  2. The development and implementation of technology applications, translation technology, or distance education, including professional development to support the use of instructional technology.
  3. Developing and disseminating curricula, including curricula incorporating the essential components of reading instruction as such components relate to adults.
  4. Developing content and models for integrated education and training and career pathways.
  5. The provision of assistance to eligible providers in developing and implementing programs that achieve the objectives of this title and in measuring the progress of those programs in achieving such objectives, including meeting the State adjusted levels of performance described in WIOA section 116(b)(3).
  6. The development and implementation of a system to assist in the transition from adult education to postsecondary education, including linkages with postsecondary educational institutions or institutions of higher education.
  7. Integration of literacy and English language instruction with occupational skill training, including promoting linkages with employers.
  8. Activities to promote workplace adult education and literacy activities.
  9. Identifying curriculum frameworks and aligning rigorous content standards that:
    1. specify what adult students should know and be able to do in the areas of reading and language arts, mathematics, and English language acquisition; and
    2. take into consideration the following:
      1. State adopted academic standards.
      2. The current adult skills and literacy assessments used in the State or outlying area.
      3. The primary indicators of performance described in WIOA section 116. (WIOA Title II)
      4. Standards and academic requirements for enrollment in non-remedial, for-credit courses in postsecondary educational institutions or institutions of higher education supported by the State or outlying area.
      5. Where appropriate, the content of occupational and industry skill standards widely used by business and industry in the State or outlying area.
  10. Developing and piloting of strategies for improving teacher quality and retention.
  11. The development and implementation of programs and services to meet the needs of adult students with learning disabilities or English language students, which may include new and promising assessment tools and strategies that are based on scientifically valid research, where appropriate, and identify the needs and capture the gains of such students at the lowest achievement levels.
  12. Outreach to instructors, students, and employers.
  13. Other activities of statewide significance that promote the purpose of WIOA Title II.

Implementation of a professional development system funded by AEFLA leadership dollars, and formed through a competitive contract awarded to the American Institutes for Research (A.I.R.), began in September of 2017. The contract provides multiple professional development and technical assistance events throughout the program year.

5.3 Nevada Adult Education Teacher Orientation

The Nevada Adult Education Teacher Orientation online course was developed by A.I.R. through a contract with the Nevada Department of Education. Administrators are responsible to ensure that new teachers complete the online course. Current or returning teachers are encouraged to complete the course. Teachers interested in taking this course should send their name, program and agency name, and preferred email address to nevadaadultedpdtechsupport@air.org.  In the subject line of the message, teachers should write “Enrollment request, Nevada Adult Education Teacher Orientation”. Within one business day, teachers will receive individual log-in instructions. Programs should maintain the Certificate of Completion for each teacher completing the course and retain based on the appropriate retention schedule.

Section 6:  Accountability: Data Collection and Reporting

The National Reporting System (NRS) defines a set of measures that describes adult education students, their participation, and the outcomes that they achieve. The State of Nevada is responsible for implementing NRS measures, methods, and requirements in a way that meet Federal guidelines; providing resources, training, and support for data collection to local programs; monitoring local programs using quality control procedures to ensure data validity; and maintaining a database that includes data from all local programs.

To ensure compliance with federal legislation and regulations, state policies and procedures, the requirements of the NRS, and the NRS Data Quality Standards for Adult Education, all adult education programs funded through the Adult Education and Family Literacy Act (AEFLA) are required to collect and accurately record student data as described in this section of the handbook.

6.1 Student Privacy

The benefits of using student data must always be balanced with the need to protect students’ privacy rights. Students should expect that their personal information is safe, properly collected and maintained and that it is used only for appropriate purposes and not improperly re-disclosed. It is imperative to protect students’ privacy to avoid discrimination, identity theft or other malicious and damaging criminal acts. All education data holders must act responsibly and be held accountable for safeguarding students’ personally identifiable information. Programs are responsible to comply with all federal and state regulations regarding student data.

Informed consent

All students should sign an Informed Consent form, which is available in English, Spanish and Chinese.

The form may be signed one of three ways by the student:

  1. Students provides SSN and signs the form (preferred),
  2. Student does not provide SSN, but signs the form to as an acknowledgement of the follow-up process, or
  3. The student does not provide SSN and refuses to sign.
    1. If a student absolutely refuses to sign, the program representative must indicate (on the Consent Form) “refused to sign”, with date and initial.

Programs may use customized versions of the Informed Consent Form providing the version includes all data from the state form.

6.2 Management Information System

Nevada AEFLA funded programs are required to use LiteracyPro Systems, Inc. LACES application to place students, track progress, and produce quarterly and annual reports.

Data Entry (Current policy for assessments is 30 days; this will be revised in next policy review)

Best practice for all data entry is that the data in question is entered within one week of collection. Programs will be allowed up to two weeks at a maximum to enter all data such as; new student registrations, assessments, attendance and follow-up survey responses.

Student Attendance

A record of attendance must be kept for every student enrolled with the following information:

  • Student name and/or student identification number
  • Class identification number
  • Date of attendance
  • Student daily hours of attendance

Programs may optionally include other information such as pre- and post-test scores on this record.  All students with at least 1 contact hour will be counted as a “WIOA Reportable Individual” for federal reporting purposes. Students with 12 or more hours will be counted as a “WIOA Participant” and will be subject to outcome measures. Attendance records are subject to the record retention policy.

Attendance may be entered directly into LACES or uploaded into LACES from another tracking program.

Personnel

For federal reporting purposes, every staff member directly involved with grant funded activities must have a staff record in LACES.

6.3 Record Retention

All student records, be they paper or electronic, must be kept in such a manner as to be easily accessible for a minimum of 36 months after the date of the final report of expenditures for each fiscal year. The rule of thumb is to retain records for five years; this insures that the minimum retention period is met. When original records are electronic and cannot be altered, there is no need to create and retain paper copies. When original records are paper, electronic versions may be substituted through the use of duplication or other forms of electronic media provided that they are subject to periodic quality control reviews, provide reasonable safeguards against alteration, and remain readable.

6.4 Performance Measures – Reporting/Accountability

The Nevada Unified State Plan proposes an accountability system of student outcomes based on collected data including these primary indicators of performance as stipulated in WIOA Section 116(b), and as they apply to the AEFLA program:

  • Employment, 2nd quarter after exit
  • Median Earnings, 2nd quarter after exit
  • Employment, 4th quarter after exit
  • Measurable Skills Gain
  • Credential Attainment
  • Effectiveness in serving employers

Core Performance Outcomes Definitions and Criteria:

Outcome: Measurable Skill Gain

Denominator (Cohort): All participants

Numerator: Total number of participants achieving a measurable skill gain.

Definition of Outcome:

  1. Participant completes or advances one or more educational functioning levels from the starting level measured on entry into the program.
    1. There are four levels for adult basic education (ABE), two for adult secondary education (ASE), and six levels of ESL.
    2. The program decides the skill areas in which to assess the student based on the student’s instructional needs.
  2. The participant exits the adult education program and enters postsecondary education within the same program year.
  3. A student at any entry level who achieves attainment of their high school equivalency.

Follow-up Measure #1: Employment Rate 2nd Quarter after Exit

Denominator (Cohort): Total number of participants who exit during the program year.

Numerator: The percentage of participants who are in unsubsidized employment during the second quarter after exit from the program.

Definition of Outcome: The number of participants who exited during the reporting period who are found to be employed, either through direct UI wage record match, federal or military employment records, or supplemental wage information, in the second quarter after the exit quarter. The exit quarter is the quarter when the participant terminates or has not received instruction for 90 days, and is not scheduled to receive further instruction.

Process for Determining Outcome:

  • Employment is working in a paid, unsubsidized job or working 15 hours or more per week in an unpaid job on a farm or business operated by a family member or the student.
  • Outcome is primarily determined through data matching at the state level.
  • Outcome may be determined by supplemental wage survey conducted at the local level.

Follow-up Measure #2: Median Earnings 2nd Quarter After Exit

Definition of Outcome: The median earnings for all participants employed in the second quarter after exit.

Process for determining outcome:

Total quarterly earnings, for all participants employed in the second quarter after exit, are collected by either direct wage record match or supplemental wage information. The collected quarterly wage information values are listed in order, from the lowest to the highest value. The value in the middle of this list is the median earnings value, where there is the same quantity of numbers above the median number as there is below the median number. Funding is based on the number of exited participants whose earnings are greater than or equal to the state median wage.

Follow-up Measure #3: Employment Rate 4th Quarter after Exit

Denominator (Cohort): Total number of participants who exit during the program year.

Numerator: The number of participants who are in unsubsidized employment during the fourth quarter after exit from the program.

Definition of Outcome: The number of participants who exited during the reporting period who are found to be employed, either through direct UI wage record match, federal or military employment records, or supplemental wage information, in the fourth quarter after the exit quarter. The exit quarter is the quarter when the participant terminates or has not received instruction for 90 days, and is not scheduled to receive further instruction.

Process for Determining Outcome:

  • Employment is working in a paid, unsubsidized job or working 15 hours or more per week in an unpaid job on a farm or business operated by a family member or the student.
  • Outcome is primarily determined through data matching at the state level.
  • Outcome may be determined by supplemental wage survey conducted at the local level.

Follow-up Measure #4: Credential Attainment

Denominator (Cohort): All participants who exited during the program year and were in either a postsecondary education or training program OR in a secondary education program at or above the 9th grade level without a secondary school diploma or its equivalent.

Numerator: The number of participants who exited during the reporting period who obtained a recognized postsecondary credential during the program or within one year after exit OR those who were in a secondary education program and obtained a secondary school diploma or its recognized equivalent during the program or within one year after exit and were also employed, or in an education or training program leading to a recognized postsecondary credential within one year after exit.

Process for Determining Outcome:

  • Follow-up surveys and/or state level data match are used to determine attainment of a recognized postsecondary credential.
  • State level data match is the primary method used to determine attainment of a secondary school diploma or its recognized equivalent and subsequent enrollment into postsecondary education or training or entry into employment.
  • For this measure a follow-up survey may be used to determine entry into postsecondary education or entry into employment for individuals who have received a secondary school diploma or its recognized equivalent.

Follow-up Measure #5: Effectiveness in Serving Employers

Retention (Retention with the same employer): Percentage of participants who are employed at the same employer in the second and fourth quarters. Repeat Business Customers: Percentage of employers who receive services that use core program services more than once.

Process for Determining Outcome:

  • Outcome is primarily determined through data matching at the state level.
  • Outcome may be determined using data collected through the supplemental wage survey conducted at the local level.

Appendix C - Acronyms and Definitions

ABE:  Adult basic education (educational functioning levels 1 through 4).

ADA: Americans with Disabilities Act

AEFLA: Adult Education and Family Literacy Act, Title II of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act which funds adult education services.

ASE: Adult secondary education (educational functioning levels 5 and 6).

CAP: Corrective Action Plan

CASAS: Comprehensive Adult Student Assessment System, a national assessment-to- instruction system based on competencies identified as essential for adults to function effectively in their multiple life roles of employees, family members and community members.

CCRS: College and Career Readiness Standards for Adult Education.

CFA: Continuation Funding Application

COABE: Commission on Adult Basic Education, a national professional association for adult educators.

DAEL: Division of Adult Education and Literacy, a division of the Office of Career, Technical and Adult Education of the United States Department of Education.

ED: U.S. Education Department, federal agency which oversees Adult Education.

EFL: Educational functioning level; the descriptor of student performance determined by standardized testing used by the National Reporting System. There are four levels (1-4) for adult basic education (ABE) learners, two levels (5-6) for adult secondary education (ASE) learners, and six levels (1-6) for English language (ELL) learners.

ELA: English language acquisition

ELL:  English language learner

ePAGE: Electronic Plans, Applications, Grants, and Expenditures system

ESL: English as a second language

Exit: The participant has not received services for the past 90 days and has no additional services scheduled. The date of exit is the last date on which the participant receives services.

FERPA: The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act, legislation which protects the rights of learners to have their educational records remain private and ensures that educational records are not shared with other agencies or individuals without the learner's written permission.

FFR: Final Financial Report

FTE: Full-time Equivalent

FY: Fiscal Year

GED®: General Educational Development test battery published by Pearson; if passed, an examinee receives the Nevada High School Equivalency Certificate.

HiSet:  High School Equivalency Test published by the Educational Testing Service®; if passed, an examinee receives the Nevada High School Equivalency Certificate.

IDEA: Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, federal legislation on education services for individuals with disabilities.

IELCE: Integrated English Literacy and Civics Education, federal funding for instruction in literacy and English language acquisition and instruction on the rights and responsibilities of citizenship and civic participation, and Section 243 IELCE program must be provided in combination with integrated education and training (IET).

IEP: Individual Education Plan, a required plan of action and educational support for pupils with disabilities in public schools.

IET: Integrated Education and Training; services that include adult education and literacy, workforce preparation skills, and workforce training for a specific occupation or occupational cluster.

IRC: Industry recognized credential

ITIN: Individual Taxpayer Identification Number

LD: Learning Disability

MOE: Maintenance of Effort

MSG: Measurable Skill Gains

NDE: Nevada Department of Education

NLUG: Nevada LACES User Group

NRS: National Reporting System for data collection and reporting as required under AEFLA.

OCTAE: Office of Career, Technical, and Adult Education, office in the United States Education Department housing the Division of Adult Education and Literacy.

OMB: Office of Management and Budget (business division of the Executive Office of the President of the United States that administers the United States federal budget and oversees the performance of federal agencies).

PD: Professional Development

PoP: Period of participation; begins each time a participant enrolls in adult education—even when multiple enrollments occur during the same program year. Subsequent enrollments during a program year result in a new period of participation.

PSE: Postsecondary education or other training at the postsecondary level.

PY: Program Year

RFF: Request for Funds

RFP: Request for Proposals

SFY: State Fiscal Year

SSN: Social Security Number

TA: Technical Assistance

TABE: Tests of Adult Basic Education

TABE CLAS-E: Tests of Adult Basic Education Complete Language Assessment System-English

TASC: Test Assessing Secondary Completion published by the Data Recognition Corporation (DRC); if passed, an examinee receives the Nevada High School Equivalency Certificate.

TESOL: Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages

WIOA:  Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act: federal workforce development legislation, of which, Adult Education and Family Literacy is Title II.

WPTS: Warning, Probation, and Termination Status

Appendix D - Laces Data Dictionary

Data Element Keys:

RF = Required for Federal compliance.

RM = Required for data management.

**Not required to create student file but should still make the effort to fill-in the information if available.

Student Records

Student Demographic Record

Every student that accrues 1 or more contact hours must have a student demographic record that includes the following information:

  1. Intake Date (RM)
    1. Record the date of initial intake into the program.
    2. This date should be on or before any other student activity (attendance, assessment, class entry. etc.)
    3. Do not update this date. It is to remain as the initial entry date.
  2. SSN (or ITIN) **
    1. Record the learner’s Social Security Number or ITIN if provided.
      1. Must come from a signed consent form.
      2. Not required for services.
  3. Last Name (RM)
  4. First Name (RM)
  5. Middle Name
    1. Include middle name when necessary to avoid duplications.
  6. Primary Program (RM)
    1. ALWAYS record “Adult Education” here
  7. Secondary Program (RM)
    1. If the student is funded using sec. 243 funds for an Integrated English Literacy and Civics Education grant, you must indicate IELCE using the Secondary Program field.
    2. The IELCE field can be updated after intake in the Education tab>Educational panel>Secondary Program field.
    3. Note: This field should be updated at re-entry of a new program year if the student transitions out of IELCE; it should not be updated mid-year.
  8. ESL (RF)
    1. Mark “Yes” by checking the provided checkbox if the learner is in a program of instruction designed to help adults with limited English proficiency achieve competence in the English language.
    2. Mark “No” by leaving the checkbox blank if the student is an Adult Basic Education program of instruction.
  9. Residence Area **
    1. Mark “Rural” for learners that reside in a place with a population of less than 2,500 that is not near any metropolitan area with a population greater than 50,000, or in a city with adjacent areas of high density.
    2. Mark “Urban” for all other learners (default value).
  10. Birth Date (RF)
  11. Gender (RF)
  12. Is Hispanic/Latino (RF)
    1. Mark “Yes” if student identifies as Hispanic or Latino, otherwise mark “No”
  13. Race (RF)
    1. Mark one or more race selections.
    2. Mark “White” if student does not identify with any of the races.
  14. Highest Education Level Completed on Entry (RF)
    1. Mark one of the choices as appropriate.
      1. For learners that attended schools that did not use a traditional grade system, use years of schooling (e.g. Six years of Schooling = 6th Grade).
    2. Note: This field is not updated after initial intake.
  15. Highest Education Level Completed on Entry Location (RF)
    1. Mark one of the choices as appropriate.
    2. Note: This field is not updated after initial intake.
  16. Employment Status (RF)
    1. Mark one of the following as appropriate:
      1. Employed
      2. Unemployed (seeking or available for employment)
      3. Not in Labor Force
      4. Employment with Separation Notice
    2. Note: Do not make futures changes to this record. Track employment changes in the learner’s Work History folder by adding new records.
    3. Note: This field does not need to be updated at the start of a new program year but should be updated for any exit of 90 or more days, in both the 2nd and 4th quarter after exit.
  17. Barriers to Employment (RF)
    1. Mark “Yes” if the learner has one or more barriers.
      1. Mark one or more barriers as appropriate (RF if marked Yes)
    2. Otherwise mark “No”
  18. Mailing Address (RM)
  19. Phone Numbers (RM)
    1. Home Phone
    2. Mobile Phone
    3. Work Phone
    4. Record as many phone numbers as provided.
  20. Email Address **
    1. Record email address if provided
  21. Contact Preference **
  22. Correctional (RF)
    1. Mark “Yes” for learners that reside in a correctional institution (prison, jail, half-way house, etc.)
    2. Mark “No” for all other learners (default value).
    3. Note: This field must be updated at re-entry in the program year for learners that leave corrections. This should not be changed midyear.
  23. Minor with Adult Status (RM)
    1. Mark this if learner is under the age of eighteen and has shown proof of eligibility.
  24. Specific Learning Disability **
    1. Mark one of the “Yes” answers if appropriate.
    2. Mark “No” for all other learners (default value).
  25. Data Sharing Agreed (RF)
    1. Mark Yes if the student (or parent if appropriate) agreed to data sharing.
      1. A State AEFLA Program Data Sharing Consent form (or State-approved agency form) must be signed and on file.
      2. This data element must be changed to No if the consent form is rescinded.
    2. Otherwise mark No (default)

Student Assessment Record

Every assessment administered for the purposes of educational functioning level placement and advancement must be recorded in LACES and include the following information:

  1. Date Assessed (RF)
    1. Record the date the assessment was administered.
    2. EXCEPTION: The LACES business rules stipulate that any attendance recorded on the same day as an assessment is considered attendance hours after the assessment. If this interferes with the calculation of “hours since last assessment”, agencies may post-date the assessment by one day.
  2. Assessment Instrument (RF)
    1. Use the provided dialog screen to choose the administered assessment.
  3. Scaled Score (RF)
    1. Enter the scaled score
      1. Determine the scaled score per test publisher instructions.
  4. Select Subject
    1. Do not use the Select Subject box on the assessment card; this field was programmed based on FY tracking, not PoP tracking. See below to update the subject based on PoP
    2. If the learner was assessed in multiple subject areas (e.g. reading and math) and you must override the subject area predetermined by the software, click the Move Forward/Subject Selection icon (the circle with the arrow at the end of the assessment row for an existing assessment) to the right of the assessment you wish the student to be tracked in.
      1. The selected subject area will be used for NRS placement on Tables 1 and 4
      2. A gain in ANY subject area within the PoP for which the student has both a pre- and post-test will be used to indicate EFL gain as an MSG in a PoP (with the understanding that on Table 4, students get credit for only one gain per PoP).

HSE Assessments

While High School Equivalency tests are not authorized for educational functioning level placement, successfully passing all of the tests can be used to demonstrate completion of an MSG. Achieving a Nevada Certificate of High School Equivalency may also demonstrate a successful WIOA core outcome. Agencies may choose to track HSE test scores (including retakes) in the learner’s Assessment folder. Alternatively, agencies may choose to record the achievement of the HSE in the learner’s Diploma folder instead. It is a best practice to always record the achievement of the HSE Secondary Credential in the learner’s Diploma Folder, even if recorded as an assessment.

Student Class Enrollment Record

Every student must have a Student Class Enrollment record for every class attended. The class enrollment record must contain the following information:

  1. IETP status (RM)
    1. IETP: Indicates enrollment in an Integrated Education and Training Program but will likely not attain a credential within the reporting year. Will populate Table 3 as an IETP student but will not auto-populate Table 5 outcome cohort of “Attain a PS Credential”.
    2. IETP/Credential: Indicates enrollment in an Integrated Education and Training Program with the intent to earn a credential within the reporting year. Will populate Table 3 as an IETP student and will auto-populate Table 5 outcome cohort of “Attain a PSE Credential”.
  2. Student Enroll Date (RM)
    1. Record the date of enrollment into the class.
  3. Student Start Date (RM)
    1. Record the date on which the student is anticipated to being attending the class.
  4. Student End Date (RM)
    1. Record the end date of enrollment
      1. May be before the end date of the class if the student exited early.
      2. May not be later than the class end date.
      3. May not be prior to attendance hours already entered for the student.
  5. Enroll Status (RM)
    1. Mark “Enrolled” for active students.
    2. Mark “Completed Class” or other appropriate choice when the student is no longer enrolled. The various “exit” statuses do not affect NRS tables other than to indicate if the student is still currently enrolled or has exited, and exit will not be officially reported for NRS purposes until the student has gone 90+ days without hours or scheduled services.

Student Class Hours Record

All student attendance must be recorded in LACES on a Student Class Hours Record. The attendance record must include the following information:

  1. Date (RF)
    1. Attendance may be entered on a daily basis or may be aggregated and entered as a batch (weekly, monthly, etc.)
      1. Batch sizes should not be larger than 31 days
    2. For daily attendance enter the actual date of attendance.
    3. When entering hours as a batch, use the last day of the batch period.
    4. All attendance record dates must be within the start and end dates of the respective class.
  2. Hours (RF)
    1. Record the actual attendance hours for each student.
      1. For partial hours, do not round to anything larger than ¼ of an hour.
  3. Type of Hours (RF)
    1. Mark one of these two choices, as appropriate:
      1. Instruction
        1. Regular in-person attendance
      2. Instruction – Distance Education
        1. When attendance meets one of the distance education types as specified in the Nevada Adult Education Distance Education Policy.

There are many different ways to enter attendance data into LACES. While each method may have its own required data, all methods must be able to produce a record with the information required by the state.

Student Core Outcome Information

Agencies should attempt a follow-up contact with every student that belongs to a follow-up core outcome cohort. Students that provide a Social Security Number may be excused from follow-up. The records must include the following information, as appropriate.

Work History Records

Work History Records record a learner’s employment history as it is made available to the program. An initial work history record is created automatically by LACES from the employment status field when entering a new student record. Subsequent work history records are added when the program learns of an update via direct notice from the student or supplemental wage information survey, or by the state as a result of a data match.

Work History records are intended as a chronological list. New records are created to record the employment status at a particular date. Always add new records, do not change the status of an existing record. Create a new Work History record for returning students.

  1. Start Date (RF)
    1. For enrolled students:
      1. Enter the actual start date of employment if known. If unknown, enter the first day of the current fiscal quarter.
    2. For exited students:
      1. Refer to the specific state policy on recording supplemental wage information.
      2. Start Date should be a date within the 2nd quarter after exit or fourth quarter after exit to indicate the follow-up was done within the correct follow-up quarter.
  2. Employment Status (RF)
    1. Choose the appropriate status (employed, unemployed, etc.)
  3. Occupation
  4. Description
  5. Employer Name
  6. Type of Employer
  7. Employer Address
  8. Employer Contact
  9. Salary
    1. Not used for NRS reporting, see Earnings below.
  10. Earnings (RF)
    1. Enter the dollar amount the participant earns during the Earnings Period.
    2. If the earnings period is Hourly, enter the number of hours per week in the Earnings Period Hours field.
    3. Enter the estimated salary or minimum wage if the student will not provide earnings information but is employed. There must be a non-zero numeric value in this field for an employed outcome to populate.
  11. Earnings Period (RF)
    1. Choose the appropriate period for the stated earnings (Hourly, Weekly, Monthly, etc.)
  12. Earnings Number of Hours (RF)
    1. This field is only available when Earnings Period is weekly.
    2. Enter the number of hours worked per week.
  13. Quarterly Earnings
    1. No input required. This filed is auto-calculated from the Earnings and Earnings Period.

Student Diploma Record

Student Diploma Info records are used to track student secondary credentials (High School Equivalency credentials and High School diplomas). Recording High School diplomas earned prior to intake is optional.

  1. Diploma/Credential Type: (RF)
    1. Choose the appropriate diploma type.
    2. For HSE, choose the test that was used (GED, HiSET, TASC).
  2. Expected Award Date
    1. Not used, record credentials only after award.
  3. Date Earned (RF)
    1. Enter the date the credential was earned.
  4. Actual Award Date
    1. Not used.
  5. Diploma/Credential Name **
  6. Description/Number **
  7. Person’s Name Displayed on Diploma **
  8. Completed Requirements
    1. Not used.
  9. By Exam Only
    1. Not used.

LACES facilitates the collection of HSE information in different ways. In addition to entering an HSE as a Diploma Info record, HSE test scores can be entered as an assessment. Using the Diploma Info record is especially useful when individual HSE test scores are not available. It is a best practice to always record the achievement of the HSE Secondary Credential in the learner’s Diploma Folder, even if recorded as an assessment.

Postsecondary Education (PSE) or Training Record: Enrolled into PSE or Training AND/OR Attained a Postsecondary Credential

Student PSE and Training Enrollment and Credential Attainment records are used to track Outcome Measures and MSG’s. This information should always be entered into LACES; the same information can potentially populate as an MSG or Outcome depending on the criteria and exit information. Education tab>Postsecondary Education or Training panel.

  1. Postsecondary Institution Type: (RF)
    1. Choose the appropriate postsecondary type of “Education” or “Training”
  2. Enroll Date: (RF)
    1. Enter the date on which the student enrolled into the PSE or training
      1. If the enroll date is prior to the student’s exit date from adult education (based on the last hours date in LACES), this cannot count for the MSG of Enrolled into PSE or Training
      2. If the enroll date is prior to attainment of a high school equivalency, this cannot count for the outcome measure of Attained a Secondary School Diploma or recognized equivalent and Enrolled in PSE or Training
  3. Only Postsecondary Institution Type and Enroll Date are required for indicating Enrollment into PSE or Training. Additional fields are required for indicating Attainment of a Postsecondary Credential:
  4. Credential Attained: (RF)
    1. The type of credential attained; must be a state approved postsecondary credential.
    2. According to OCTAE guidance, proprietary trade schools cannot be used for PSE or training outcomes.
  5. Date Earned: (RF)
    1. The date on which the student earned the postsecondary credential
    2. Must be after the Enroll Date

Student Educational Information Record

The Student Educational Information record is created with data supplied from the student intake form.

  1. Date First Intake
    1. This date should reflect the very first date of intake into you program.
    2.  This field is not updated after initial intake.
    3. Additional enrollment dates are automatically tracked in the History>Enrollment Program History/Overall Status History panels.
  2.  Highest Education Level Completed on Entry
    1. This field is set to the student’s education level that corresponds to the “Date First Intake” field.
    2. This field is not updated after initial intake.
    3. If a returning student has a blank entry, refer to the Demographics Record for instructions.
  3. Highest Education Level Completed on Entry Location
    1. Mark one of the choices as appropriate.
    2. This field is not updated after initial intake.
  4. ESL
    LACES uses this field to determine if a student is measured and reported as an ESL learner, or as an ABE/ASE learner.
    1. When marked “Yes” by checking the provided checkbox:
      1. LACES uses an administered pretest assessment to place students in one of the six ESL educational functioning levels
      2. LACES uses subsequent assessments to measure ESL educational level gain
    2. When marked “No” by leaving the provided checkbox blank:
      1. LACES uses an administered pretest assessment to place students in one of the six ABE educational functioning levels
      2. LACES uses subsequent assessments to measure ABE educational level gain
    3. This field must be set appropriately at the beginning of each year prior to administration of any assessments.
    4. Once set, the ESL field should not be changed midyear. This applies even if the student moves from ESL programming to ABE programming, or vise-a-versa.

Student Goals Record

These NRS secondary outcomes remain goal driven:

  • Achieve work-based project learning goal
  • Achieve citizenship skills
  • Vote or register to vote
  • Increased involvement in community activities
  • Leave public assistance
  • Increased involvement in child's education
  • Increased involvement in child's literacy activities

Each record must contain the following information:

  1. Date Set (RF)
    1. Enter the date the goal was set.
  2. Date Met (RF)
    1. When creating the record, leave blank.
    2. When the goal has been met, record the date of goal attainment
  3. Status (RF)
    1. Select one of the following values as appropriate:
      1. Active: This should be used for all new goals set by the student in the current fiscal year and not yet met.
      2. Unmet: This should be used at the end of a fiscal year to indicate if the student did not meet an active goal within the fiscal year. If the student continues in your program in the following fiscal year, the goal should be entered again as a new, active goal in the new fiscal year, after changing the old goal to Unmet.
      3. Met: This should be used to indicate that the student has met the goal. This will automatically be set by the database if a Met Date is entered.
      4. Achievement: This should be used if the student obtained an unintended outcome, or met a prior fiscal year goal. Unintended outcomes are goals that the student met without initially setting it as a goal. Goals are also considered achievements if the student set the goal in a prior fiscal year and met it in a later fiscal year.
  4. Goal (RF)
    1. Select the appropriate goal

Student Unlinked Hours Record

Student Unlinked Hours record provides a means to account for student attendance that is not linked to any class activity.

Whenever possible, attendance hours are to be recorded as class hours. In the event that a Student Unlinked Hours record is used to record attendance, the record must include the following information:

  1. Date (RF)
    1. Enter the date for the hours
  2. Type (RF)
    1. Choose one of the following, as appropriate:
      1. Instruction
      2. Instruction – Distance Learning
  3. Hours Present (RF)
    1. Record the actual amount of hours
      1. Do not round to values larger than ¼ hour.

It is advised that a note be added to the student’s Comment folder describing the reason for the unlinked hours.

Optional Student Records

Services>Accommodations: The Student Accommodations folder allows you to track any necessary accommodations requested by the student due to apparent or disclosed disabilities.

Student Data>Documents: Allows you to upload student documents for data validation/evidence.

History>Address History: The Student Address History folder allows you to track the student’s Address History over their time in your program. (The student’s current address can be updated directly in the Key Info folder without retaining history of the previous address.)

Student Data>Comments: The Student Comments folder allows you to track any comments added to the student record during their time in your program.

Demographics>Corrections: The Student Corrections folder allows you to record inmate specific information related to students in a corrections program.

History>Fiscal Year: The Student Fiscal Year folder contains summary fiscal year information regarding the student for current and past fiscal years. The records are read-only. The current fiscal year record is updated when new fiscal year summary records are created, either manually by your program or automatically by LACES.

Demographics>Health Data: The Student Health Data folder allows you to track health data that may affect the student’s ability to learn and attend to instruction.

Demographics>Identification: The Student Identification folder allows you to track any identifying documentation used by your students. This folder is used mainly to add forms of identification in addition to the Social Security Number. The SSN would be entered or edited here if not added at intake.

Education>Instructional Areas: The Student Instructional Areas folder allows you to track instructional data for your students. This would be program specific information. Neither the state nor NRS use this data.

Education>Language: The Student Languages folder allows you to track native, spoken, written, and read languages used by your student.

History>Level History: The Student Level History folder shows the educational functioning levels (EFL) obtained and completed by the student. Do not manually add or edit any records in this folder.

Education>Material: The Student Material folder contains material data populated from the Materials tab. Data in the Material folder cannot be added to or modified from the student folder, but only viewed. Changes would need to be made in the Material record in the Material tab.

History>Overall Status History: The Student Overall Status History folder shows you the overall status history of the student during their time in your program. The folder is read-only.

Student Data>Preferences: The intention of the preferences folder is to match a student with a compatible pair or group. Not currently setup for Nevada.

Student Data>Personal Data: The Student Personal Data folder allows you to track personal data for your students. This is similar to the Keywords and Custom Fields in that it primarily exists to allow you to track information that is not already a pre-generated field in LACES.

History>Enrollment Program History: The Student Enrollment Program panel shows you the program registration history for the student. All students should be registered as “Adult Education” per Nevada policy. This folder will show the history of any changes. Do not add or edit records in this folder. Use the Student KeyInfo folder to make changes to the student’s program registration type.

Services>Referrals: A student may be referred by another provider, or referred to another provider for reasons determined by the agency and/or student. You may track that information here if desired.

Services>Social Services: The Student Social Services folder allows you to track social services received by your students.

Class Records

For every instructional class period where one or more students accrue attendance hours, a class record in LACES must exist.

Class Data Record

  1. Start Date (RM)
    1. While it is preferred that the date coincides with the first day of instruction, certain classes may need to have a start date that is on a significant day such as the first day of the fiscal year or semester.
    2. The start date may not be earlier that July 1 of the fiscal year.
  2. End Date (RM)
    1. While it is preferred that the date coincides with the last day of instruction, certain classes may need to have an end date that is on a significant day such as the last day of the fiscal year or semester.
    2. The class end date may not be later that June 30 of the fiscal year.
  3. Course Number (RM)
    1. Every class must have an agency assigned course number.
    2. May be alphanumeric.
    3. Does not have to be unique.
  4. Title (RM)
    1. Every class must have an agency assigned title.
    2. The title should be concise and descriptive.
    3. Does not have to be unique.
  5. Program (RM)
    1. Assign one of the following program types, as appropriate:
      1. Adult Education
        1. General purpose ABE program type
      2. ESL
        1. General purpose English language program type
      3. IELCE
        1. Use for any ESL class that is funded wholly, or in part, with IELCE grant funds.
  6. Status (RM)
    1. Choose the appropriate class status (Active, Prospective, etc.) Note that students cannot be enrolled into a class with the Status of Prospective, Scheduled or Completed
  7. Max Enroll (RM)
    1. Enter the maximum number of students to enroll in this class.
      1. This field is useful to prevent overfilling a class. Set to high number for open enrollment classes.
  8. Department **
  9. Description **
  10. Term (RM)
    1. Choose the fiscal year term for the class (e.g. 2016-2017, 2017-2018, etc.).
  11. Instruction at 9th Grade Level or above
    1. Only use this checkbox if all students enrolled in this class are expected to attain their high school equivalency within the fiscal year. This box is used to indicate evidence of instruction at a 9th grade level or above for inclusion on the Table 5 outcomes required such evidence, and students enrolled in a class with this indicator will automatically be included in the cohort for the educational Table 5 outcomes.
  12. Days **
  13. Times **
  14. Bldg./Room **
  15. Location **
  16. Location Detail **
  17. Class Keyword **
  18. Level **
    1. For information only. Does not influence the students’ educational functioning level.

Class Instructor Record

  1. Assigned Staff
    1. Every class must have at least one staff member assigned.
    2. When multiple staffs are assigned, one must be designated as primary.

Staff Records

Every staff member directly involved with grant funded activities must have a staff record in LACES. Every staff record must include the following information:

  1. Title/Prefix
  2. Last Name (RM)
  3. First Name (RM)
  4. Middle Name
    1. Including middle name when necessary to avoid duplications. (RM)
  5. SSN – DO NOT USE
    1. Maintain in HR records elsewhere.
  6. Overall Status (RM)
    1. Choose appropriate status (Active, On Hold, Left)
  7. Classification (FM)
    1. Choose appropriate type
      1. Top-level administrators are always classified as administrators even if they also teach.
      2. For other multiple-role employees, choose the classification with the highest FTE.
      3. You can also add additional classifications in the Staff Data tab>Classifications panel. Staff cannot be listed with multiple full-time classifications.
  8. Employment Status (FM)
    1. Regular Staff – choose this for paid employees
    2. Volunteer or Volunteer tutor – choose this for unpaid staff.
    3. Contractor – DO NOT USE
  9. Full-Time (FM)
    1. Mark Yes if the employee is a full-time paid employee.
    2. Mark No for part-time employees and volunteers.
  10. Hire Date **      
  11. Start Date (RF)
    1. Enter the date the employee started working with your specific adult education program.
  12. Years Teaching Experience in Adult Ed (FM)
    1. Enter the number of years of teaching experience in adult education only. Do not include teaching experience in primary, secondary, or postsecondary education.
    2. One complete class session or other structured period of teaching in a fiscal year or more counts as one year of instruction.
    3. Update this field annually for all active teachers. (FM)
  13. Highest Degree/Diploma Earned. **
  14. Prior Related Experience-Years **
  15. Prior Teaching Experience-Years **
  16. Program **
  17. Department **
  18. Staff Keyword **
  19. Position Title **
  20. Address 1 **
  21. Address 2 **
  22. Zip **
  23. City **
  24. County **
  25. State **
  26. Mail Preference **
  27. Home Phone **
  28. Mobile Phone **
  29. Work Phone **
  30. Email **
  31. Contact Preference **
  32. Birthdate **
  33. Gender **
  34. Ethnicity **

Staff data tab>key info panel

The Staff Key Info panel allows for edits and updates to the Staff Record.

Staff data>classifications panel

Allows updates to classifications or additions for staff with multiple roles. Staff cannot have multiple full-time classifications listed.

Staff data>credentials panel

Staff Credential records are used to track various credentials and certificates a staff member may hold. Recording of certain credentials for teachers is required (see policy statement below), while other teacher certificates and credential are optional. Recording credentials for non-teaching staff is optional.

If staff member classified as a teacher holds any of the following, it must be recorded.

Staff Credential record

  • Adult Education Certification— credential issued by an accredited college or university for a degree or coursework that focuses on teaching adults (does not include the Nevada Adult Basic Educators Certificate of Performance).
  • K-12 Certification— a credential recognized by the State that focuses on teaching children.
  • Special Education Certification— a credential recognized by the State that focuses on teaching children or adults with disabilities or special needs.
  • TESOL Certification— a credential recognized by the State that focuses on teaching English to speakers of other languages.
  1. Credential/Certification Type: (FM)
    1. Choose the appropriate type.
  2. Expected Award Date
    1. Not used, record credentials only after award.
  3. Date Earned (RM): Must be entered for the data to be capture for Table 7.
  4. Actual Award Date
    1. Not used.
  5. Name of Credential or Certificate **
  6. Diploma/Credential Type **
  7. Description/Number **
  8. Person’s Name Displayed on Diploma **
  9. Completed Requirements
  10. By Exam Only

Staff Assignments tab

While assigning teachers to classes is usually handled at the class record, this provides an alternative method. It also allows for the viewing and managing of all of the class assignments a teacher may have.

Optional Staff Records

Staff Data>Documents: Allows you to upload staff documents you may wish to have on file.

Hours tab: The Staff Hours panel allows you to track any hours worked in classes assigned to the staff member.

History>Fiscal Year: The Staff Fiscal Year panel contains summary fiscal year information regarding the staff member for current and past fiscal years. The records are read-only. The current fiscal year record is updated when new fiscal year summary records are created.

History>Staff History: The Staff History panel is populated automatically based on the status of the staff member. Additionally, you can add data or make edits to the staff history record.

History>Work History: The Staff Work History panel allows you to track the staff member’s employment history over their time in your program.

Staff Data>Material: The Staff Material panel contains material data populated from the Materials tab. Data in the Material panel cannot be added to or modified from the staff panel, but only viewed. Changes would need to be made in the Material record in the Material tab.

Staff Data>Comments: The Staff Comments panel allows you to track any comments added to the staff record during their time in your program.

Professional Development tab: Allows you to track professional development hours earned through attending trainings or conferences.